Sunday, August 13, 2006

My first week in Cardiology


Apologies I haven't had much time the past few weeks to update the blog dear readers. Last week has been a semi-monumental one, as I change jobs from one speciality to another. Last week I started cardiology. During the week I was introduced to my new team mates and I have started to get to know them. They do seem a cool bunch - so far so good.

The cardiology firm has also proven to be excellent grounds me to learn and gain experience. Our consultant grilled us with (difficult) questions at each ward round, and in the first week alone I've already had the opportunity to do 2 central lines, 1 femoral line, 1 ascitic drain insertion and 1 pleural aspiration. Way to go!!

Perhaps from a tiny bit of frustration from not pursuing a surgical career, but I definitely enjoy doing procedures, like the ones I just mentioned. I enjoy every opportunity to practice doing them in the hopes that the skills wouldn't become blunt (no pun intended) with disuse.


One exciting thing that happened last week was when we received a Japanese patient, who spoke little English. Upon hearing so, I gleefully clapped my hands in front of my work mates exclaiming what a good opportunity it would be to practice the language (with a native speaker).

At the consultant ward round, the conversation went as follows:
Konnichiwa, Mynn to mo shimasu. Yoroshikuu. Sumimasen ne? Sukoshi dake Nihongo o wakarimasu kara.
(hello, my name is Mynn, pleased to meet you. I'm so sorry but I only understand a bit of Japanese)

The consultant was examining and I had to translate:
  • Te o agete kudasai (can you please raise your arms?)
  • Ashi o agete kudasai (can you please raise you legs?)
  • Me o tojite kudasai (can you please close your eyes?)
I also had to ask:
  • Karada ga itaimasu ka (does your body hurt?)
  • Senaka ga itaimasu ka (any abdominal pains?)
  • Atama ga itaimasu ka (any headaches?)

I thought I was doing well, until the consultant asked me to ask:

Do you have any vaginal discharge?

That question met largely with silence on my part, less I attempt and in return get slapped! I don't even know what the Japanese word for *that* is :T (1)

PS
(1) However, having watched Yakitate! Japan, I do know what the word for the male equivalent is - LOL. It's chin-chin, (I think!) ROTFL.

(2) It's a good thing I've been warned many times before NOT to talk like in anime. I could just imagine myself going (imagine with little twinklies appearing on my head):

"Ah konnichiwa nee-san! Mynn-chan desu!! kyou wa daijoubu? genki ka? Genki neee? Yubbikiri! Jaa ne, nee chan! ha ha ha" <- as I skip away.
(hello sister, it's mynn chan! how are you today? okay? okay right?? promise! okay see you sister!) <- would get me a slap, or at least, stares.

11 comments:

pycnogenol said...

So Mynn, you must remember when in Japan, NEVER to say that you have chinchin emas or chinchin perak.

I can just hear all those Japanese exclaiming: AWWWWWWW!!!!! the moment they discover the meaning of emas and perak. They'd be scrambling all over you Mynn....ROTFL!!!!

mrs fungus said...

LOL~
ye gak eh..
forgot tht chinchin sounds like cincin in bm..

i only impersonate anime talking style when i'm all alone.. wahaha

mynn said...

pycno
i didn't even think of cincin when i wrote chinchin! hahaha. btw welcome back from your 3 hari 2 malam :) hope it was good.

mrs fungus
women, boleh dimaafkan if they speak like anime. most characters in anime are women anyway (in my opinion e.g. mai hime, love hina, mai otome etc2) so the danger of speaking like an anime character is speaking like a girl, neee?

Anonymous said...

Mynn-

Good to hear that you are getting along fine with the new cardio team and even managed to impress them with your prowess in Japanese language, albeit in anime style (nobody would know of course except for the poor patient! hehe)

I suggest you write a mangga on medical jargons and stuffs!

dr in the house said...

Mynn-

Good to hear that you are getting along fine with the new cardio team and even managed to impress them with your prowess in Japanese language, albeit in anime style (nobody would know of course except for the poor patient! hehe)

I suggest you write a mangga on medical jargons and stuffs!

p.s. please delete the above anon spam

kenakelayan said...

There is another Japanese 'rude word' that sounds like a common Malay word. No wonder our Japanese guest was soo distressed!!

No Mynn I am not telling you. :D

mynn said...

DITH
I am SOOOOOOOOO enjoying cardiology dith! so much i want to say & tell of my experience so far. now it's my second week and in these 2 weeks, i felt that i've learnt more than months of working in some other previous post. today alone I got to do cardioversion, see a patient about to have an intra aortic baloon pump, see a paroxysmal SVT, and assist in doing a subclavian central line. in one day!

KKL
haaaa, you've made me curious. what's the word??????? the only other rude word i know is the Kuri to Risu joke. (kuri means nuts) (risu means squirrel). the joke is when you say kuri-to-risu as one word and say the "r"s like "l"s (ie. pelat orang jepun). i'm laughing even as im typing this!!! (the anime that taught me that joke was Ebichu)

Dith again
infact dith, the japanese i used was proper, and formal. There's also a MORE formal level of the language (using irrashai etc222 instead of "desu") but to me super formal japanese is like learning another language. if i used anime japanese, the lady probably would have laughed at my stupidity or snorted in disgust (i know because i've made the mistake once before!! *laughs thinking about it*)

kenakelayan said...

Dang Mynn you got me saying it out loud. Good thing no one is around.
Hehehe I will tell OK and let him tell you. Hint: almost an everyday word one lah.

mynn said...

KKL! LOLOLOLOLOLOLOL.

ala ... bagi lah hint lagi clear KKL.

kenakelayan said...

Er... we use one everyday. Depends which type according to what needs to be done: either to upload or download. :D

Anonymous said...

This is very interesting site... »